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August 16, 2014 at 1:32 AM

zaheerforthepeople:

I was once asked what it means to enter the void. I will tell you. An airbender may meditate for a hundred years trying to detach herself from the world, but she cannot do it. Humans cherish human life, and by that they are bound to this world. The only way to abandon the world is to abandon one’s humanity. New growth cannot exist without first the destruction of the old. The void is found in the sowing of death. From that death springs life on the wind.
-Guru Laghima

zaheerforthepeople:

I was once asked what it means to enter the void. I will tell you. An airbender may meditate for a hundred years trying to detach herself from the world, but she cannot do it. Humans cherish human life, and by that they are bound to this world. The only way to abandon the world is to abandon one’s humanity. New growth cannot exist without first the destruction of the old. The void is found in the sowing of death. From that death springs life on the wind.

-Guru Laghima

Photoset

June 12, 2013 at 12:23 AM

iraffiruse:

Frozach Submitted

Whoaaa…

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May 2, 2013 at 11:57 PM

acalc:

An artist’s conception of an “eyeball Earth”, a planet tidally locked and perpetually facing a red dwarf star in a close orbit. Some scientists theorize that this hypothetical class of planets may be good candidates for harboring life; and they would be relatively easy to detect because of the light-dimming disturbance of the star due to the planet’s close and frequent revolution.

acalc:

An artist’s conception of an “eyeball Earth”, a planet tidally locked and perpetually facing a red dwarf star in a close orbit. Some scientists theorize that this hypothetical class of planets may be good candidates for harboring life; and they would be relatively easy to detect because of the light-dimming disturbance of the star due to the planet’s close and frequent revolution.

Photoset

April 13, 2013 at 8:44 PM

kmkubo:

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April 9, 2013 at 8:22 PM

science-junkie:

3-D Printed Material Mimics Biological TissueFor the first time, scientists have printed structures that mimic the texture, consistency and certain properties of biological tissue. The manmade “tissues” are nothing more than water droplets encased in oil, stacked atop one another, but the scientists were able to construct stable structures that held their form for weeks, structures that conducted electricity and even structures that folded similarly to how muscle cells do.  The researchers used a type of 3-D printer to eject an aqueous solution (water containing some salts) into a bead of oil, which was suspended in more of the aqueous solution. By carefully arranging the droplets, the researchers were able to get them to stick together. In other words “You’re just dropping spheres onto other sticky spheres.” After the “print” was completed, the researchers skimmed off the extra oil, leaving a sturdy, jelly-like structure that somewhat resembled brain and fat tissues.The research was detailed in this week’s issue of the journal Science.Source: technewsdaily.com

science-junkie:

3-D Printed Material Mimics Biological Tissue

For the first time, scientists have printed structures that mimic the texture, consistency and certain properties of biological tissue. The manmade “tissues” are nothing more than water droplets encased in oil, stacked atop one another, but the scientists were able to construct stable structures that held their form for weeks, structures that conducted electricity and even structures that folded similarly to how muscle cells do. 

The researchers used a type of 3-D printer to eject an aqueous solution (water containing some salts) into a bead of oil, which was suspended in more of the aqueous solution. By carefully arranging the droplets, the researchers were able to get them to stick together. In other words “You’re just dropping spheres onto other sticky spheres.” After the “print” was completed, the researchers skimmed off the extra oil, leaving a sturdy, jelly-like structure that somewhat resembled brain and fat tissues.

The research was detailed in this week’s issue of the journal Science.


Source: technewsdaily.com

Photoset

April 9, 2013 at 8:20 PM

lunaghoststar:

Golden Orb Spider Farm

“Current medical advances in the area of infertility medicine and neonatology have made total ectogenesis (the gestation of a human being entirely outside the body of a human female) less a figment of the imagination of science fiction writers … and more a realistic possibility for those living in the not so distant future.”

The project is based on research into how spider silk might become a material of choice for prototyping scaffolds on which to grow human tissue. Research in tissue engineering has indeed found that silk is a better substance than polymeric materials to construct such ‘scaffolds’. Fully functioning hearts and wombs have already been grown artificially on silk scaffolds.

Advances in reproductive science and medicine would enable the complete gestation of a human embryo outside a woman’s body, within the next 5-10 years. In the ethically complex scenario where humans are brought to life in artificial wombs, one can imagine that mother would want to demonstrate maximum love and commitment by providing the the finest and most luxurious womb they could afford. Rather than the synthetic unglamorous Biosteel, mothers might look for rarer, naturally produced alternatives. Golden Orb spider silk, the most precious silk in the world, might answer their wishes.

Last year already, a large and rare textile was made entirely of Madagascan Golden Orb spiders silk - demonstrating its inherent strength, beauty and value.

Golden Orb spider farm speculates that employers may want to persuade their high calibre employees to delay having children in return for hi-tech fertility insurance. Female employees would receive glass Gold Orb spider farms in which to house and breed spiders. The women would feed spiders with flies every day. Once a month, a silking machine would extract several metres from each spider in the farm. In due course this gift is passed on to the child that emerges from the silky womb. Once used, this object might take on a new role of a family heirloom.

[source+more]

(via moonfall-requiem)

Link

April 9, 2013 at 8:19 PM

Build your own bio-printer →

biotechia:

Why should medical facilities get all the fun? A new post on Instructables shows you how to build a machine that lets you print your own organic matter.


You can find the project on Instructables here.

Photoset

April 1, 2013 at 11:14 PM

atomstargazer:

Science Summary of the Week
Last Week in Science via IFLS

Cancer genes: http://bit.ly/XkbFug
Magnetic charges of matter & antimatter: http://bit.ly/XBZbtN
Seven sex mating system: http://bit.ly/15ZOuVp
Down’s Syndrome: http://bit.ly/105Cznm
Gene therapy: http://bit.ly/160HEz6
Neanderthal hybrid: http://bit.ly/YJxbVl

Science Summary of The Week

➤ Rapid Cancer Cure: http://is.gd/l0XR86
➤ Artificial Sperm Cells: http://is.gd/4V1uTE
➤ Two-Headed Shark: http://is.gd/k1fkmC
➤ Living Cells’ Computer: http://is.gd/y41US4
➤ New Type of Supernova: http://is.gd/M9jGpp
➤ Turning CO2 Into Fuel: http://is.gd/4s7jMN

Scientists’ Birthdays:
➤ March 25, 1786 - Italian scientist, Giovanni B Amia
➤ March 26, 1941 - English scientist, Richard Dawkins
➤ March 27, 1847 - German chemist, Otto Wallach
➤ March 29, 1883 - American chemist, Donald Van Slyke
➤ March 30, 1894 - Russian airplane builder, Sergey Ilyushin
➤ March 31, 1854 - Inventor Dugald Clerk
Enlarge This Graphic : http://is.gd/AItN4k
More Science Infographics on My Flickr Page : http://is.gd/q08fCv

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April 1, 2013 at 11:12 PM

bpod-mrc:

Balls and Sticks
Biology is applied chemistry, chemistry is applied physics, and physics is applied maths. But nature cares little for the traditional lines separating the disciplines. And cutting-edge laboratories reflect this increasingly by encouraging researchers to work in interdisciplinary teams. For example, biophysicists discovered that by mutating four genes associated with an enzyme found in all our cells (CGI of the protein, in red and blue, pictured), they disturbed the finely-tuned electrostatic field (represented by white lines) that surrounds the molecule and controls its shape, and how it attracts vital chemicals. Because even mild defects in the enzyme can cause a rare mental disability called Snyder-Robinson syndrome, it’s critical that biologists explain how complex molecules work in as much detail as possible. For that, they need to understand physics and even quantum mechanics. Ball-and-stick models won’t do anymore.
Written by Tristan Farrow
—

Yoshihiko Ikeguchi, Josai University, Japan 
Emil Alexov, Clemson University, USA
Originally published under a Creative Commons Attribution license
Published in PLoS Computational Biology 9(2): e1002924

bpod-mrc:

Balls and Sticks

Biology is applied chemistry, chemistry is applied physics, and physics is applied maths. But nature cares little for the traditional lines separating the disciplines. And cutting-edge laboratories reflect this increasingly by encouraging researchers to work in interdisciplinary teams. For example, biophysicists discovered that by mutating four genes associated with an enzyme found in all our cells (CGI of the protein, in red and blue, pictured), they disturbed the finely-tuned electrostatic field (represented by white lines) that surrounds the molecule and controls its shape, and how it attracts vital chemicals. Because even mild defects in the enzyme can cause a rare mental disability called Snyder-Robinson syndrome, it’s critical that biologists explain how complex molecules work in as much detail as possible. For that, they need to understand physics and even quantum mechanics. Ball-and-stick models won’t do anymore.

Written by Tristan Farrow

Photo

April 1, 2013 at 11:06 PM

(Source: patakk)